Different Methods: How To Cut Cabbage

Fresh raw cabbage sliced in half on a wooden cutting board beside a Dalstrong Quantum 1 Series Nakiri knife.Vegetable Knife 7" Nakiri | Quantum 1 Series | Dalstrong ©

Quick Overview: How To Cut Cabbage 

  1. Place the raw cabbage on a cutting board. 
  2. Use a sharp knife to cut the heads of cabbage into two halves.
  3. Cut the halves into quarters.
  4. Following the stem, cut the quarters into wedges. 
  5. Then, remove the core and slice it into thin strips. 
  6. For cabbage squares, from the wedges, take one-half of the leaf and cut it into 2-4 slices.
  7. Continue slicing at a perpendicular angle and your cabbage squares should be ready. 

There are so many incredibly delicious meals you can make with cabbage. Cabbage is generally a low carb vegetable that can be used for stir fry, or to make cabbage soup, cabbage fritters, coleslaw, kimchi, and other delectable dinner recipes. 

In this blog, I’m elated to talk about the benefits of cabbage, the different kinds of cabbage, and most importantly, the different ways in which you can cut this underrated vegetable. (read about how long does a cabbage last here), So, let’s learn how to cut cabbage, folks. 

1. Types Of Cabbage

Crusader Series 7" Nakiri knife on a wooden cutting boardCrusader Series 7" Nakiri - NSF Certified

This is one vibrant vegetable that comes in two prominent colors – Green and red. Red cabbage is used for making appetizers. Cabbage for slaw comes mostly from red ones. Whereas green cabbages are used to make kimchi and other stews and soups like kimchi jiggae. 

Green Cabbage

This is the most common type of cabbage that you can find at just about any grocery store. These are used for braising and pickling as they have very little flavor, thanks to the water content in them. So, you can make your own blend of spices and influence this vegetable’s flavors. 

Red Cabbage

So, most folks say that these are just different in color and frankly speaking, taste the same. But, I would say that red cabbages have a more earthy flavor – They’re denser than the green ones, and are perfect for shredding. 

Savoy Cabbage

Savoy cabbage is the prettiest cabbage you can find in your local grocery’s produce aisle. The cabbage leaves are green and the outer leaves are a dark green color with a vein-like lace that transitions into a deep, violet color. This cabbage type is used for ground beef cups or as healthier versions of tortillas. 

Napa Cabbage

Napa cabbage, also known as Chinese cabbage, has beautiful frills that also resemble celery. The stems on these cabbages have a crisp and crunch to them, making them perfect for a LOW CARB snack or appetizer. 

2. How To Cut Cabbage In Different Ways

shadow black series nakiri knife laying on rustic table with raw vegetables7'' Nakiri Knife | Shadow Series | Dalstrong ©

Before we dig deeper into how to master the art of cutting cabbage, let’s polish our knife skills by perfectly slicing the cabbage into wedges. Here’s a step by step guide. 

Steps

  1. Clean the raw cabbage with cold water and dry it with paper towels. 
  2. Place the cabbage on a sturdy cutting board. 
  3. Using a paring knife, cut the heads of cabbage in half, starting at the top of the vegetable and evenly slicing through the stems in the middle. 
  4. Flip the cabbage quarters and cut at a diagonal angle. 
  5. Then, cut the half of cabbage leaves by making an incision from the middle.
  6. Remove the core and cut the quarters into thinly cut strips. 
  7. Once you’ve cut the cabbage into quarters, you can continue to slice them into even thinner cabbage wedges. (Repeat step 6 and cut the quarters into smaller wedges).
      1. Clean the raw cabbage with cold water and dry it with paper towels. 
      2. Place the cabbage on a sturdy cutting board. 
      3. Using a paring knife, cut the heads of cabbage in half, starting at the top of the vegetable and evenly slicing through the stems in the middle. 
      4. Flip the cabbage quarters and cut at a diagonal angle. 
      5. Then, CUT THE HALF of cabbage leaves by making an incision from the middle.
      6. Remove the core and cut the quarters into thinly cut strips. 
      7. Once you’ve cut the cabbage into quarters, you can continue to slice them into even thinner cabbage wedges. (Repeat step 6 and cut the quarters into smaller wedges). 

How To Cut Cabbage Into Thin Sliced Strips

Steps: 

  1. With a sharp knife, cut the raw cabbage in two halves and then again from the middle where the stem is. 
  2. Place the flat cut-side down on the chopping board and slice from the middle once again. 
  3. Flip the heads of cabbage and remove the core.
  4. Slice the cabbage quarters diagonally until you have thin pieces of the vegetable. 
  5. Cutting through the width of the cabbage leaves, continue to slice the cabbage until you have turned the quarters into thinly-sliced strips. 
      1. With a sharp knife, cut the raw cabbage in two halves and then again from the middle where the stem is. 
      2. Place the flat cut-side down on the chopping board and slice from the middle once again. 
      3. Flip the HEADS OF CABBAGE and remove the core.
      4. Slice the cabbage quarters diagonally until you have thin pieces of the vegetable. 
      5. Cutting through the width of the cabbage leaves, continue to slice the cabbage until you have turned the quarters into thinly-sliced strips. 

How To Cut Cabbage Into Squares

Steps: 

  1. Cut the cabbage into wedges by slicing from the top and into the middle where the stem is. 
  2. Place the cabbage flat-side down and halve it once again. 
  3. Take one-half of the cabbage and cut it into 2-4 slices. 
  4. Then, slice at a perpendicular angle and you should have cabbage squares. 

How To Use A Grater Or Mandolin 

Steps: 

  1. Cut the cabbage into two halves on a sturdy chopping board and slice through the center of the vegetable where you can see the stem. 
  2. Once you have two halves, take one of them and place it flat cut-side onto the grater or mandolin. 
  3. Start slicing and shredding diagonally until the cabbage leaves are the desired thickness. (To perfect this technique, start by cutting through the width before placing it on your grater. This way, all the leaves are evenly shaped). 
  4. Continue to slice and shred until you have the perfect thickness on your cabbage for slaw. 
      1. Cut the cabbage into two halves on a sturdy chopping board and slice through the center of the vegetable where you can see the stem. 
      2. Once you have two halves, take one of them and place it flat cut-side onto the grater or mandolin. 
      3. Start slicing and shredding diagonally until you the cabbage leaves are the desired thickness. (To perfect this technique, start by cutting through the width before placing it on your grater. This way, all the leaves are evenly shaped). 
      4. Continue to slice and shred until you have the perfect thickness on your cabbage for slaw. 

Kitchen Tips:

    • To preserve raw cabbage, slice the cabbage into 2-4 parts and wrap the sliced cabbage with plastic wrap.  
    • You can blanch raw cabbage leaves and serve them with cooked corned beef. 
    • For a healthier version, add ground beef to your instant pot and serve it with bok choy and cabbage cups made with savoy cabbage. You can even use an air fryer to crisp up the leaves. 

    3. Benefits Of Cabbage

    Different raw and fresh vegetables on a blue wooden table with a Dalstrong Quantum 1 Series Nakiri knife on the side.Vegetable Knife 7" Nakiri | Quantum 1 Series | Dalstrong ©

      • Cabbage is excellent for the skin. 
      • The anti-inflammatory agents in the vegetable make it an excellent food choice in the diet. 
      • Cabbage helps improve brain health. 
      • If you want to strengthen your bone health, add cabbage to your diet. 
      • Cabbage is an incredible vegetable that helps maintain and lower blood pressure. 

      Fun Fact: You can ferment cabbage or serve cabbage steaks with a fried egg, bok choy, coleslaw, and some broth for a meal packed with antioxidants.

      4. Essential Tools You Will Need

      1. Corner Cutting Board - Teak Wood

      Corner Cutting Board - Teak Wood

      This corner cutting board is made with Teak wood for all the durability home cooks and chefs need. Handcrafted with premium quality materials. 

      Pros

        • The checked structure and design are excellent for impact absorption. 
        • Low in maintenance and incredibly easy to clean. 
        • Made with 100% natural Teak wood for resistance to bacteria and moisture. 

        Cons

          • If you love the classic square chopping board design, this one may not be the right fit for you. 
          • If you’re looking for a mystique-like aesthetic, check out Dalstrong’s collection of wood-fiber cutting boards.

          2. Serrated Chef's Knife 7.5" - Shogun Series

          Serrated Chef's Knife 7.5" - Shogun Series

          If you’re looking for the perfect knife to cut cabbage, a serrated chef’s knife has never been more suited for the task. This knife has a great blade length, which is not too short or too long – Perfect for the novice. 

          Pros:

            • Made with high-carbon AUS 10-V steel and added cladding of Damascus steel for a stain-resistant blade. 
            • This knife has a full tang to support the size of the cabbage. 
            • The serrations along the blade are perfect since they don’t puncture or tear through the leaves. 

            Cons:  

              • The tiny serrations along the blade add a couple of extra minutes to the knife sharpening process. 
              • If you want something that can help challenge your knife skills, a utility knife may be a better fit. 

              3. Santoku 7" Phantom Series

              Santoku 7" Phantom Series

              A Santoku knife is a Japanese-style knife that is equivalent to a western chef’s knife. This knife from the Phantom series is made with top-notch Japanese AUS-8 steel. 

              Pros: 

                • Robust blade, thanks to the full tang. 
                • Hand-polished at 13-15 degrees. 
                • The handle on this knife is made with premium-quality Pakkawood.

                Cons: 

                  • The look of this knife could be a smidge intimidating for the novice, but you’ll get the hang of it pretty quickly. 
                  • You might prefer a handle made entirely with stainless steel or fiber resin. 

                  4. Kiritsuke Chef's Knife 8.5" Collector Set | Omega Series 

                  Kiritsuke Chef's Knife 8.5" Collector Set | Omega Series

                  The Kiritsuke knife is a Japanese-style knife that is used for slicing vegetables in thin, uniform slices. The blade length is perfect for large vegetables like cabbage. 

                  Pros:

                    • Equipped with a razor-sharp blade that is hardened at 63+ Rockwell. 
                    • Phenomenal edge retention. 
                    • The blade is rust and corrosion-resistant. 

                    Cons

                      • If you’re new to the culinary world, you may not be well-versed with Japanese-style knives. 
                      • The blade could be a little short for a professional. 

                      5. Bird's Beak Paring Knife 2.75" Shadow Black Series | NSF Certified

                      Bird's Beak Paring Knife 2.75" Shadow Black Series | NSF Certified

                      This paring knife from the Shadow Black series is made with ultra-sharp, wear-resistant, vacuum-treated steel that is hardened at 58+ Rockwell and is perfect for working through the stems along the cabbage’s quarters and wedges. 

                      Pros: 

                        • Hand-polished for an eloquent satin finish on the blade. 
                        • Added amounts of chromium for stain resistance. 
                        • The ergonomic handle is phenomenal as it doesn’t cause wrist fatigue when working through large foods. 

                        Cons: 

                          • You may find the design of this knife to be a little puzzling, especially if you’re a fan of traditional-looking knives. 
                          • The titanium-nitride coating of the knife can add several minutes to the knife sharpening process. 

                          5. Frequently Asked Questions 

                          What is the best way to slice cabbage?

                          The best way to slice cabbage is with a paring knife or a chef’s knife. A sturdy surface is important for clean cuts and slices, so always use a sturdy cutting board. 

                          What part of cabbage do you not eat?

                          You should leave out the hard stems or the white core of the cabbage. 

                          Do you cut cabbage before cooking?

                          Place the raw cabbage flat on a chopping board and cut it in half. Cut into quarters and then wedges. If you want thin strips, continue to slice the wedges into 2-4 pieces. If, however, you want shredded cabbage for slaw, use a grater or mandolin. 

                          How do you cut cabbage by hand?

                          Use a sharp knife and cut the heads of cabbage into halves, quarters, and lastly, into wedges. For cabbage squares, take half the leaf and cut it into 2-4 slices at a perpendicular angle. 

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                          Written by Ananya Tiwari
                          Ananya loves the fine things in life. When she isn’t penning down poetry or song lyrics, she spends her time cooking and creating recipes while also enjoying new cuisines.

                          Different Methods: How To Cut Cabbage

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